G20

From growth to prosperity and well-being: How did G20 leaders deal with labour market issues?

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G20 change in how to talk labour

G20 leaders in Hamburg met against the background of high levels of uncertainty and dissatisfaction in their countries’ populations. Growing levels of inequality, the unclear impact of digitalisation, high youth unemployment, bad conditions for workers in global supply chains. These major global challenges were also mirrored in the manifold peaceful demonstrations in which protestors demanded a change in thinking about growth and globalisation. Did the G20 leaders adequately address these worries or did they continue with business-as-usual? Did they address the important questions of the future? 

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Reading recommendation: For the G20 – Let’s return to the original idea

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Need the G20 to get back to the routes?

At its creation the G20 was meant to facilitate coordination, cooperation and problem-solving among key actors in a specific policy field, which then was global financial stability. The G20 was not meant to be a jack-of-all-trades, offering welcoming words and restating support for long-accepted and previously reconfirmed goals, as most subsequent G20 summits did. The list of unmet global challenges is lengthening and the human, political, environmental and economic costs of global crises are mounting. So wouldn’t this be the time, Inge Kaul, Professor at the Hertie School of Governance, asks, to revert to the original G20 concept as a global forum for announcing concrete measures to resolve—not just chat about—the most pressing global challenge? Please continue reading…

From Taormina to Hamburg: A fruitful G7-G20 relationship?

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Blog Series: What remains of the G20 Hamburg Summit?

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A rising sun on th G7-G20 relationship?

Only six weeks went by between the Taormina G7 and Hamburg G20 meetings, which were both chaired by a major EU Member State. A substantive link between the two summits was therefore to be expected. Indeed, at least to some extent, a useful connection was set in motion. The results of these two events seem to suggest an informal – but organic – relation between the diplomatic and cooperative efforts of the much narrower and more homogeneous G7 with the G20 summit.

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Hamburg Summit may see G20 leaders’ meeting return to its informal roots

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G20 at its Peak

I have been writing about the G20 for seven years. The G20 has evolved substantially over that time, with an ever-broadening agenda that now covers issues far beyond those envisioned in the first G20 summits in Washington and London over 2008 and 2009, when the G20 was at its peak as a globally influential governance body. As a result, and in order to stay on top of the expanded agenda, the trend has been towards greater reliance by G20 Ministers and Leaders upon lower-level officials and bureaucrats to both prepare and even draft the main G20 outcome documents – particularly the final communique.

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How the G20 can bring about a more functional MDB system

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Image: AIIB Headquarters in BeijingEnhancing the role of Multilateral Development Banks (MDBs) in sustainable global economic development has been an important issue for G20 leaders since their first meeting in 2008. For leaders, the primary purpose of revitalizing the MDBs was to counter the cyclical effects of the crisis. As the subprime crisis receded, the focus of leaders and the overall G20 agenda since 2010 has shifted towards growth, for which infrastructure financing has been highlighted as a key driver.

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