Dirk Messner

The Munich Security Conference – three world orders in the making

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Image: Munich Security Conference
New directions from Munich

Bringing together more than 400 foreign and security policy elites from the transatlantic community and an irritatingly small number of representatives from the non-Western world, the Munich Security Conference somewhat resembled a couple’s therapy session and an attempt at self-reassurance. Does the West still exist? Do we still need the West? What is the West about? And, finally, a huge question, which world order is it worth fighting for?

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Trumps election is a turning point for the world order.

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Image: Ruins after earthquake
A political earthquake unleashed?

Donald Trump will become President of the USA on 20 January 2017. Even if he only implements part of what he has announced, a political earthquake will be unleashed. This  will radically change the conditions the 2030 Agenda and the Paris Climate Agreement. Efforts to organize global cooperation need to be massively expanded: the EU needs to strengthen its international profile, and it needs a 100-day programme outlining its priorities. The German G20 Presidency can help to strengthen climate protection and the 2030 Agenda. These are the foundations upon which the transatlantic partnership as well as dialogue between societies must move forward.

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Herculean tasks for the G20 in 2017

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Image: Fotolia, Container Port
The Focus is not limited to Economy and Finance

Germany will take on the G20 Presidency in December 2016. This is a role which involves tremendous opportunities and responsibilities in a difficult global economic and political Situation. A visionary and global outlook is required in order to pave the way for a more secure future. The G20 is an indispensable actor when it comes to the future of global governance as a means of shaping globalisation. The industrialised nations and emerging economies that make up the G20 account for over 80% of global GNP, greenhouse gas emissions and resource consumption.

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