The T20 blog is an initiative of the German Development Institute / Deutsches Institut für Entwicklungspolitik (DIE) and the Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW). Both institutes have been encouraged by the German government to organise the T20 process during Germany’s G20 Presidency in 2016 and 2017. The T20 organises the collaboration of global think tanks and high-level experts in order to provide analytical depth to ongoing G20 discussions and produce ideas to help the G20 on delivering concrete and sustainable policy measures. The blog intends to bring an additional dimension to the way the T20 engages with members of our own research network, the broader public, and the German G20 presidency in advance of the 2017 G20 Summit in Hamburg.


From growth to prosperity and well-being: How did G20 leaders deal with labour market issues?

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G20 change in how to talk labour

G20 leaders in Hamburg met against the background of high levels of uncertainty and dissatisfaction in their countries’ populations. Growing levels of inequality, the unclear impact of digitalisation, high youth unemployment, bad conditions for workers in global supply chains. These major global challenges were also mirrored in the manifold peaceful demonstrations in which protestors demanded a change in thinking about growth and globalisation. Did the G20 leaders adequately address these worries or did they continue with business-as-usual? Did they address the important questions of the future? 

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Reading recommendation: For the G20 – Let’s return to the original idea

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Need the G20 to get back to the routes?

At its creation the G20 was meant to facilitate coordination, cooperation and problem-solving among key actors in a specific policy field, which then was global financial stability. The G20 was not meant to be a jack-of-all-trades, offering welcoming words and restating support for long-accepted and previously reconfirmed goals, as most subsequent G20 summits did. The list of unmet global challenges is lengthening and the human, political, environmental and economic costs of global crises are mounting. So wouldn’t this be the time, Inge Kaul, Professor at the Hertie School of Governance, asks, to revert to the original G20 concept as a global forum for announcing concrete measures to resolve—not just chat about—the most pressing global challenge? Please continue reading…

From Taormina to Hamburg: A fruitful G7-G20 relationship?

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Blog Series: What remains of the G20 Hamburg Summit?

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A rising sun on th G7-G20 relationship?

Only six weeks went by between the Taormina G7 and Hamburg G20 meetings, which were both chaired by a major EU Member State. A substantive link between the two summits was therefore to be expected. Indeed, at least to some extent, a useful connection was set in motion. The results of these two events seem to suggest an informal – but organic – relation between the diplomatic and cooperative efforts of the much narrower and more homogeneous G7 with the G20 summit.

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A step to the side: the G20’s climate dance

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Make the finance sector climate resilient
Blog Series: What remains of the G20 Hamburg Summit?

The result of this year’s G20 summit was not a major step forward in solving the climate problem. However, the confrontation with President Trump ended not in a full clash, but rather in a diplomatic climate dance – taking one step back, one step to the side, and one step forward. This presents an opportunity to continue with a climate tango from a new starting point in Argentina in 2018.

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Did the G20 Hamburg Summit advance 2030 Agenda implementation?

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Not a breakthrough, but some opportunities
Series: What remains of the G20 Hamburg Summit?

One major goal of the German G20 Presidency was to promote the implementation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and its 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), which are essential to addressing the challenges faced by the world.  The outcome of the 2017 Hamburg Summit is not a breakthrough for sustainable development, but it does offer some opportunities for real progress.

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